The Committed Podcast Talks about Beats, iTunes, AppleScript and more

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The Committed Podcast Icon 1400x1400 01On this week’s episode of The Committed podcast, Ian Schray and I welcome special guest Doug Adams, purveyor of the Doug’s AppleScripts for iTunes website. We talk about iTunes and AppleScript, and we discuss Apple’s rumored acquisition of Beats.

Check out The Committed podcast, Episode 34: “Beats”.




5 replies
  1. Chip says:

    Interesting podcast, but I still think y’all don’t get it. Complaining about how “the Beats aesthetic is not the Apple aesthetic” is pointless; it’s a design aesthetic that’s popular and preferred to the tune of nearly $1.5 billion last year. Thinking that “maybe Jony Ive’s gonna’ redesign it” is wrong for a number of reasons, perhaps most importantly because this differentiated aesthetic attracts customers who chose not to buy into Apple’s – making it more Apple-like would kill off those sales and make the products less desirable to those customers who made Beats #1. Much much better to let the two design aesthetics sit alongside one another (as they have done for years in Apple Stores) and let them crowd out the competition (and make the competition have two aesthetic design competitors to deal with instead of one).

    Also not getting it is somehow thinking it’s important that “Apple does not have a history of maintaining brands that they buy.” So what? *Most* consumer companies do maintain brands — look at Harmon as one example, which successfully runs AKG, Lexicon, Digitech, Crown, Revel, dbx, Infinity, Soundcraft and a dozen more well-known profitable brands. Sure, a much smaller Apple under Jobs didn’t like to manage multiple brands, but there no real reason not to buy and maintain a highly-profitable purchased brand or two today.

    Reply
    • Kirk McElhearn says:

      All valid points. But it’s a departure from Apple’s usual way of doing things – if it turns out to be true. And perhaps that’s the way things will be in the future; we’ll have to wait and see.

      Reply
  2. Chip says:

    I think Apple’s dealing with the aftermath of explosive growth from iOS, and the inevitable leveling off of growth. Instead of staying in place and hoping to hit with a new transformative/disruptive product/service while trying to stay a step ahead of tech companies who brazenly steal new/iterative designs, Apple is negotiating a new world where they seem to be branching out with complementary products and services that are NIH, and not necessarily in their current wheelhouse.

    Remember, #1 company today in wearables is… Beats. :) Where’s the puck going? Maybe it’s many sensors collecting info for us without our thinking twice about it, and giving us info when we need it. (jsnell went on about this in the latest TechHive podcast, comparing it to how he don’t think about all the sensors in our cars nowadays.) Having a complementary brand like Beats going forward (which is even earning its keep) could be a good thing…

    As for a nearer timespan, I’m personally surprised that Apple hasn’t come out with an iOS-based 2.1 stereo Soundbar/AppleTV/gamebox. That’s an area ripe for disruption, with current mediocre designs in the $200-$400+ price range. Perhaps we’ll see one with Beats audio eventually, plug and play. 5.1 purists might grouse, but a single box connected to the net via 802.11ac that streams/sells music, movies and games and substantially improves TV sound could be a real hit….

    Reply
    • Kirk McElhearn says:

      I certainly expect Apple to do something more with the Apple TV. But would a soundbar be attractive to enough people? My guess is that most people who use the Apple TV have good enough stereos. A soundbar might get new users into the fold, but Apple’s only real foray into “hi-fi” was pretty much a disaster.

      Reply
  3. Chip says:

    Most people don’t have stereos hooked up to TVs. Most people under 30 probably don’t have stereos at all, just smallish Bluetooth/wired things in the BR/LR and TV speakers playing without help. (More so in Europe and Asia.) Someone who connects to a full-size stereo is more likely to be older, and/or a gadget geek. A simple Apple solution could sweep (and grow) the market. Throw in casual gaming and you’ve got a bigger market than game-machines and soundbars have, and with enough channels it makes for a compelling reason to unplug the Roku.

    Apple HiFi was an embarrassment but it was Apple seeing how much Bose was swooping in and taking (esp in the Spple Store) and Apple trying to get some of that action. With Beats it’s much the same thing (Beats has been in Apple Stores since its founding) but Cook seemingly decided to learn from the HiFi mistake.

    I hope Apple responds to Chromecast and opens up channels to more devs (it’s apparently quite difficult to get in touch with Apple about getting on AppleTV; Apple wants to court devs of their choosing, mostly). Pricing should be cognizant of the lock-in effect for apps/movies/music/streaming, so I’d hope that a basic AppleTV device comes out at a lower price point too…

    Reply

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