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The History of Hidden Album Tracks

“On July 2, 1969, Paul McCartney recorded “Her Majesty” live with his acoustic guitar in Abbey Road Studios. The song, less than 30 seconds long, took three takes get down. It was meant to appear between “Mean Mr. Mustard” and “Polythene Pam” on Abbey Road‘s now-famous B-Side Suite, but on July 30, McCartney decided he didn’t like that sequence. He asked the tape operator, John Kurlander — a young man just starting out in music production — to get rid of “Her Majesty” all together. Kurlander, as the story goes, knew to never destroy a Beatles recording, so he removed the song and instead tacked it on to the end of the album, leaving 14 seconds of blank tape between it and “The End.” When the album was pressed, “Her Majesty” didn’t appear on labels or album covers, making it one of pop music’s first hidden tracks.”

via The History of Hidden Album Tracks | Wondering Sound.

I was interviewed for this article, because I don’t like hidden tracks. It’s interesting to see the lengths that some artists have gone to in creating hidden tracks. But I still think it’s a futile exercise in doing something that’s cool just for the sake of being cool.

   

1 Comment

  1. In a similar vein, why do some tracks at the end of an album have 10 minutes of silence tacked on to the end? It is so annoying, as you make a nice playlist and the 3rd song is 4 minutes of music and 10 minutes of silence (or some muted noises or whatever).

    I love the new CD from Arcade Fire “Reflektor” but the last song “Supersymetry” has this flaw.

    Reply

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